Joe Teehan

Joe Teehan

Broadcasting has always been my second love – right behind music. I earned a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Northern Colorado and spent a number of years working (starving, really) as a freelance trombone player in Chicago and Denver. I soon realized I would need another profession to fall back on, so I chose the very stable (ha!) radio industry.

My first job was at a newstalk station in Denver. After a few years there I was hired to be news director at a station in Summit County, Colorado. Skiing and radio were my life. I returned to Denver after about a year in the mountains and became a long-haired rock jock. I worked at stations in Denver and Phoenix during the 1990’s, then suddenly found myself unemployed and playing Mr. Mom following the birth of our son. I was teaching beginning instrumental music to 5th graders when I was lucky enough to land a job at the mighty KGMI early in 2003.

My wife, Laurie, is a radio star in her own right and has been half of the morning show at Classic Rock KISM since then. Our son, Tommy, is 9 years old and loves Bellingham. Our new daughter Ella Ray was born last December. Laurie’s been through a very rough year following brain surgery to repair an aneurysm and we’ve truly found out how loving and giving our adopted community is. Thank you for being our neighbors.


Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

Today in entertainment history: Aug. 28

shaniatwain

A look at Hollywood's most memorable headlines.

in Local

Department of Fishing closing parts of Nooksack River

salmon

Low flows and warm water temperatures prompted the fishing ban on several stretches of the river.

in Local

Rain returning to Whatcom County in big way

cars rain

We could see up to 2-and-a-half inches of rain just this weekend.

in Local

Lummi Nation done talking about proposed Coal Terminal

In this photo taken Oct. 23, 2012, a dilapidated structure is seen jutting out into the Strait of Georgia along the beach just south of the location of a proposed coal exporting terminal in Ferndale, Wash., just north of Bellingham, Wash. In the distance behind are an existing aluminum plant and oil refinery. The progressive college town of Bellingham is at the center of one of the fiercest environmental debates in the region: should the Northwest become a hub for exporting U.S. coal to Asia? A proposal to build one of as many as five coal terminals here has divided the town, pitting union and businesses that welcome jobs against environmentalists who worry about coal dust and greenhouse gas emissions. A trade group is running TV ads touting the projects, while numerous cities such as Seattle and Portland are opposing coal trains through their communities.

The tribe says it sent the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers its final letter on the matter and now expects the corps to deny permits for the project.

in Local

Bids in for construction of new Skagit County jail

prison

The new 108-thousand-square foot jail will feature a health services area and a secure perimeter with concrete panels.