News

Bill heading to Inslee raises car tab fees

Bill heading to Inslee raises car tab fees

Photo: clipart.com

AP News

SEATTLE, Wash. – Most vehicle owners will pay more for their car tabs next year in a bill heading to the governor’s desk that will save the state money on building a new ferry in Washington.

The state Department of Licensing and its agents will begin collecting a $5 service fee for vehicle registrations and a $12 fee for title transactions on Jan. 1, under the measure.

The Everett Herald reports that the money specifically will pay for a new 144-vehicle Olympic-class vessel.

Two similar ferries are currently under construction by Vigor Industrial in Seattle and ferry officials and lawmakers say extending the contract instead of negotiating a new one will save money in labor and materials.

Gov. Jay Inslee is expected to sign the legislation.

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