News

Money starts to flow in for gun initiatives

Money starts to flow in for gun initiatives

Photo: clipart.com

AP News

OLYMPIA, Wash. –¬†While voters won’t weigh in on two competing gun-related ballot measures for months, money is already pouring into the campaigns in advance of the November election.

One measure proposes universal background checks for all gun sales and transfers in Washington state, with some exemptions.

The other would prevent the state from adopting background-check laws that go beyond the national standard, which requires the checks for sales by licensed dealers but not for purchases from private sellers.

Initiative 594, which would expand background checks, has a significant fundraising advantage over Initiative 591.

Both campaigns are expected to draw national money in the coming months.

The initiative to expand the checks has raised about $3.4 million, and has been pledged more than $500,000 more by one donor, compared to I-591’s $1 million.

Recent Headlines

in Local Sports

Blazers come from behind for 115-112 win over Thunder

Fresh
Portland Trail Blazers head coach Terry Stotts

LaMarcus Aldridge had 29 points and 16 rebounds

in Local

Feds spot third baby orca born recently to imperiled pods

orca

Biologist: baby whale looks healthy

in Sports

Travis Kvapil’s NASCAR car stolen from hotel before race

NASCAR driver Travis Kvapil uses a cell phone in the garage at Atlanta Motor Speedway Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Hampton, Ga. Kvapil's NASCAR Sprint Cup car was stolen early Friday, forcing him to withdraw from a race this weekend at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

Police say Travis Kvapil's NASCAR Sprint Cup car has been stolen ahead of a race this weekend near Atlanta.

in Local Sports

Former Mariner Bret Boone is writing a memoir

**FILE** Seattle Mariners' Bret Boone throws his bat after hitting a double against the Oakland Athletics in the first inning on Monday, April 14, 2003. It was announced Sunday, July 3, 2005, that Boone was cut by the Mariners after a half-season of struggles at the plate.

Former Mariners Bret Boone figures the best way to tell a baseball story is through his own family.