News

New safety rules proposed to curb oil train fires

New safety rules proposed to curb oil train fires

Photo: clipart.com

KGMI News Reporting
By Tracy Ellis

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As part of its plan to deal with oil trains, the U.S. Department of Transportation is proposing speed limits for some trains, but they wouldn’t have to slow down in Whatcom County.

The Wichita Eagle in Kansas reports the plan to slow crude oil trains with older tank cars in urban areas would not apply to many areas concerned about derailments.

The proposed rule would require a 40- mph speed limit in cities with more than 100,000 people.

Bellingham’s population is 82,000.

A 60 day public comment period offers smaller cities a chance to voice their concerns.

There are some people who don’t think a 40 mph speed limit is enough, saying crude oil and ethanol trains have derailed at lower speeds.

The DOT would also like thousands of older rail tank cars that carry crude oil to be phased out.

It says DOT-111 tank cars need to be retrofitted or replaced.

Recent Headlines

28 mins ago in Local

Driver not guilty in deadly Ferndale crash

Fresh
image

Two Windward High School students killed, two others seriously hurt when SUV hit them last June

11 hours ago in Local

Western State Hospital builds fence to keep patients from escaping

hospital, healthcare, medical, doctor

Nearly 200 involuntarily committed patients at Western State Hospital walked away from the mental facility since 2013... even though at some point... they were considered a danger to themselves or others

12 hours ago in Local

Demonstrators set up homeless camp outside of Bellingham City Hall

homeless

The makeshift homeless camp was meant to send a message to city leaders about breaking up homeless camps.

1 day ago in Local

Reasons determined for plane crash last July

Autumn Veatch

Their teenage step-granddaughter, Autumn Veatch of Bellingham, was the only survivor of the crash.

1 day ago in Local

Bellingham Schools’ Superintendent “walks in the shoes” of LGBTQ students

bellingham-high-school

"Walks in the Shoes" helps Baker get a better understanding of what his staff and students experience in the district.