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Would-be terrorist arrested in Blaine

Would-be terrorist arrested in Blaine

KGMI News Reporting, AP news

BLAINE, Wash. – A former U.S. Army National Guard soldier has been arrested in Whatcom County accused of planning to join a terror group overseas.

Twenty-year-old Nicholas Teausant from California was arrested in Blaine Sunday night by the FBI.

Federal prosecutors say Teausant was planning to cross the Canadian border and then make his way to Syria to join Al Qaeda.

Court documents say Tousant used social media to show a desire to conduct a violent jihad and to be part of America‚Äôs “down fall”.

He told an FBI informant that he wanted to be involved in some kind of terrorist attack.

Investigators say Teausant got off a train in Seattle and got on a bus that was headed to Vancouver.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection stopped the bus in Blaine and took Teausant into custody.

Court documents say he was a soldier in the U.S. Army Reserve, but was no longer active because he failed to meet basic academic requirements.

The Seattle PI reports that Teausant claims to be a Mercer Island native and a Seahawks fan.

 

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