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Florida woman arrested in topless rampage at McDonald’s

Florida woman arrested in topless rampage at McDonald’s

Photo: Associated Press/Gene J. Puskar

MIAMI (Reuters) – A bare-breasted woman wearing only bikini bottoms was observed by security cameras vandalizing a Florida McDonald’s.

In the video, which went viral on Tuesday, the woman is seen shoving cash registers onto the floor, overturning a drinks dispenser and throwing items at staff before helping herself to some ice cream.

Sandra Suarez, 41, entered the McDonald’s in Pinellas Park on Florida’s west coast on March 24, and when an employee asked her to put on some clothes, she refused and became destructive, according to a police report obtained by the Tampa Bay Times.

“She destroys it,” Pinellas Park police spokesman Sgt. Adam Geissenberger, told the newspaper. “You name it, she’s turning it over.”

The police report said she caused about $10,000 in damage.

Suarez was taken to a local hospital and was charged with felony criminal mischief and resisting arrest.

(Reporting by David Adams and Kevin Gray; editing by Gunna Dickson)

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