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Jacqueline Bisset’s bizarre Golden Globes acceptance speech

Jacqueline Bisset’s bizarre Golden Globes acceptance speech

Photo: YouTube

Actress Jacqueline Bisset had the censors pressing buttons at the Golden Globe Awards early on Sunday after uttering the ceremony’s first expletive as she attempted to wrap up a rambling speech while ceremony bosses played music in an attempt to get her offstage.

The star was the night’s second award winner when her role in “Dancing at the Edge” earned her a Best Supporting Actress prize, and after taking an eternity to get to the stage at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, she appeared flustered as she began her acceptance speech.

As the music started, she shook herself and said, “I’m gonna get this together,” before adding, “I want to thank the people who have given me joy, and there have been many, and the people who have given me (expletive). I say like my mother… ‘Go to hell and don’t come back!’

“However… I believe, if you wanna look good, you’ve got to forgive everybody… I love my friends, I love my family and you’re so kind.”

WARNING: Explicit content

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