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Michael Jackson has earned $600M since dying

Michael Jackson has earned $600M since dying

KING OF POP: The King of Pop reportedly owed around $400 million prior to his death. Photo: Associated Press

The late Michael Jackson was plagued with debt before his death in 2009, but almost five years later, his estate has earned $600 million in revenue.

The King of Pop reportedly owed around $400 million prior to his death, and executors have been making amends for his excessive spending by generating funds for his three children’s inheritance by striking various publishing and licensing deals.

According to new documents filed in a California court, Jackson’s estate now holds $18 million cash and has earned $600 million in revenue.

Jackson’s kids, Prince, Paris and Blanket, are the main beneficiaries of the haul, receiving $8 million per year, which includes $3 million for education, $300,000 for vacations and $15,000 in pocket money.

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