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NASCAR tells drivers to stay in car in wake of fatal crash

NASCAR tells drivers to stay in car in wake of fatal crash

NASCAR: The most widely followed motorsports organization in the United States said it would require drivers involved in accidents to must remain in their car unless it unsafe to do so due to fire or smoke. Photo: Associated Press

(Reuters) – A new NASCAR rule announced on Friday forbids drivers from getting out of their cars during caution periods in races, following an on-track fatality last weekend when three-time champion Tony Stewart struck and killed a driver gesturing at him.

The most widely followed motorsports organization in the United States said it would require drivers involved in accidents to must remain in their car unless it unsafe to do so due to fire or smoke.

Stewart, 43, struck Kevin Ward, Jr., 20, during a dirt track race last Saturday in upstate New York after Ward left his car and pointed at Stewart while standing in the middle of the track.

“As we’ve demonstrated though in our history, we’re willing to react quickly to different incidents,” Robin Pemberton NASCAR’s vice president of competition and racing development, told reporters at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan.

“And it’s not just NASCAR, it’s about all of sports and all of motorsports we take note of.”

(Reporting By Steve Ginsburg; Editing by Scott Malone and Susan Heavey)

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