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Newlywed gets 30 years in husband murder case

Newlywed gets 30 years in husband murder case

30 YEARS: In this Tuesday, Dec. 10 photo, Jordan Graham, center, is flanked by defense attorneys Michael Donahoe, left, and Andy Nelson, as she leaves court in Missoula, Mont. Photo: Associated Press/Stephan Ferry

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — A Montana newlywed who pleaded guilty to charges she pushed her husband to his death in Glacier National Park has been sentenced to 30 years in prison.

U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy sentenced 22-year-old Jordan Graham of Kalispell on Thursday. She had faced a maximum sentence of life in prison after pleading guilty to second-degree murder.

Prosecutors alleged Graham was having second thoughts about her 8-day-old marriage to 25-year-old Cody Johnson when she lured him to a steep cliff in Glacier National Park on July 7 and pushed him over.

Graham insisted it was accidental but changed her plea to guilty in the midst of a jury trial.

Prosecutors charged she planned the killing then lied to cover it up.

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