News

‘Real American Hero’ turns 50

‘Real American Hero’ turns 50

G.I. JOE: This Jan. 31, 2014 photo shows a Gen. George Patton G.I. Joe action figure, right, and other G.I. Joes in a display at the New York State Military Museum in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. A half-century after the 12-inch doll was introduced at a New York City toy fair, the iconic action figure is being celebrated by collectors with a display at the military museum, while the toy's maker plans other anniversary events to be announced later this month. This Jan. 31, 2014 photo shows a Gen. George Patton G.I. Joe action figure, right, and other G.I. Joes in a display at the New York State Military Museum in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. A half-century after the 12-inch doll was introduced at a New York City toy fair, the iconic action figure is being celebrated by collectors with a display at the military museum, while the toy's maker plans other anniversary events to be announced later this month. Photo: Associated Press/Mike Groll

CHRIS CAROLA, Associated Press

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. (AP) — G.I. Joe is turning 50.

The birthday of what’s called the world’s first action figure is being celebrated this month by collectors and Hasbro Inc., which introduced it in 1964.

G.I. Joe was introduced at the annual toy fair in New York City in early 1964 and hit the shelves in time for the 1964 Christmas shopping season. It soon became a big seller at $4 apiece, identifying him as “America’s Moveable Fighting Man.”

Don Levine, Hasbro’s head of research and development, came up with the idea while returning home from combat as an Army infantry sergeant in the Korean War. “We protected each other and loved each other,” Levine said this week. “Something had to be done to honor these people.”

Sales sank in reaction to the Vietnam War, leading to a line “Adventure Team” G.I. Joes that played down the military connection. Production was halted in the 1970s. In the early 1980s, G.I. Joe was reintroduced as 3¾-inch figures. It was inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame in 2004.

The action figure has an official G.I. Joe Collector’s Club, which holds an annual “GIJoeCon” convention. This year it’s in April in Dallas.

Collectors will mark the toy’s 50th birthday this Saturday by displaying some of their G.I. Joes at the New York State Military Museum in Saratoga Springs.

Hasbro says it intends to announce details of its 50th anniversary plans during this year’s fair in New York on Feb. 16-19.

Recent Headlines

in Local Sports

Bellingham Post 7 baseball season comes to an end

bellingham post 7 baseball logo 1

Bellingham wraps up the season with a 41-and-10 record.

in National, World

Israel warns of long Gaza war as Palestinian fighters cross border

Israeli soldiers patrol outside the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu dashes any hopes of a swift end to the three-week conflict as Palestinian fighters launched an audacious cross-border raid.

in Sports

Judge OKs record-setting $2B sale of Clippers

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, center, and V. Stiviano, left, watch the Clippers play the Los Angeles Lakers during an NBA preseason basketball game in Los Angeles on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. NBA spokesman Mike Bass said in a statement Saturday, April 26, 2014, that the league is in the process of authenticating the validity of the recording posted on TMZ's website. Bass called the comments "disturbing and offensive."

A judge has ruled against Clippers owner Donald Sterling and cleared the way for the $2 billion sale of the team to Steve Ballmer.

in Local Sports

Kearse has gone from undrafted to lock for Seattle

Seattle Seahawks' Jermaine Kearse in action at an NFL football camp practice Friday, July 25, 2014, in Renton, Wash.

Once an undrafted free agent and seeming longshot to make the Seahawks roster, Kearse might now fall into the category of being a lock when the final 53-man roster

in Local Sports

DI all-star shortstop, Fine, transferring to WWU  

western washington logo generic copy/wwu

Mount Vernon graduate, Alicia Fine, who played last three years at Portland State will transfer to WWU beginning this fall.