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Spring ahead! Daylight-saving time starts Sunday

Spring ahead! Daylight-saving time starts Sunday

HERE COMES THE SUN: The days will get longer so hopefully we'll all get a little more sun. Photo: clipart.com

Daylight-saving time starts this weekend (officially at 2 a.m. Sunday) with the “spring forward” roll ahead of your clock by one hour. That means you lose an hour of sleep but it also means come Sunday night the sun will stick around later and the days will begin getting longer. Could it be that spring is finally here? While we hold out hope for a warmup, enjoy these four fun facts about daylight-saving time.

turnback

Think everyone’s doing it? You’re wrong.
Daylight Saving Time is observed in most countries around the world, but not even every American state observes the turn-back practice. Hawaii, Arizona and Puerto Rico don’t turn their clocks back, which means they also never have to move them forward again six months later. The states join other countries, including Japan and Russia, which avoid it.

lightbulb

Who the heck came up with this idea anyway?
Benjamin Franklin – who was an early-riser himself – first proposed the idea as a way to make people more productive, according to the author of “Seize the Daylight.” But it wasn’t until World War I bought about an energy crisis that the practice gained steam and by 1918 federal law standardized it.

heartattack

Daylight-saving time may be unhealthy
According to a study published by The New England Journal of Medicine, the risk of heart attacks increases for several days following the time switch. The study says the changes can disrupt your body’s natural rhythm, affecting sleep.

crash

Your Monday morning commute might be a headache
A 2011 study by Johns Hopkins and Stanford universities found that traffic accidents increase the day after the change. Studies have also shown that workplace injuries jump, mostly blamed on employees’ lack of sleep the night before.

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Photo: Associated Press

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Ravens fans trade in their Rice jerseys at stadium

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Thousands of fans have traded in their Ray Rice jerseys for those of other Baltimore Ravens at the team's stadium store.