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Turns out ‘God’ has bad credit

Turns out ‘God’ has bad credit

GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT: A man whose name is God says he's got a good credit rating. Photo: clipart.com

NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City man claims that a credit reporting agency falsely reported he had no financial history because his first name is God.

According to the New York Post, God Gazarov of Brooklyn says in a lawsuit that Equifax has refused to correct its system to recognize his name as legitimate.

He says an Equifax customer service representative even suggested that he change his name to resolve the issue.

Gazarov is a Russian native who is named after his grandfather.

The 26-year-old owns a Brighton Beach jewelry store and is a graduate of Brooklyn College.

He says he has high scores with two other major credit agencies.

The Post says Equifax did not return calls or emails seeking comment.

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