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Would you pay $2K for a sewage plant wedding?

Would you pay $2K for a sewage plant wedding?

A WEDDING TO REMEMBER:For $2,000 you could be married at a sewage plant. Photo: clipart.com

WOODINVILLE, Wash. (AP) — A sewage treatment plant near Seattle is advertising its availability as a wedding venue.

The Brightwater Wastewater Treatment Center says on Facebook it has a full catering kitchen, audio-video equipment, dance floor and ample parking.

You could even hold the wedding outside.

The director of the Brightwater Environmental Education and Community Center, Susan Tallarico, tells KIRO TV that receptions would take place just steps away from where raw sewage is processed. She says there’s no odor because all the processing is contained.

The King County plant was finished three years ago but has been available for rent for about seven months.

It costs $2,000 to rent the center for eight hours. One couple has already booked the sewage plant for their nuptials.

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