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Boston Red Sox are band of bearded brothers

Boston Red Sox are band of bearded brothers

BEARDED BOSTON: Boston Red Sox's David Ross rubs his beard during a news conference at Fenway Park Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, in Boston. The Red Sox are scheduled to host the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 1 of baseball's World Series on Wednesday. Photo: Associated Press/Charles Krupa

beards
Boston Red Sox players, top row from left, Jonny Gomes, Ryan Dempster, Mike Napoli and David Ortiz, and bottom row from left, Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Dustin Pedroia, David Ross and Mike Carp sports beards during a workout at Fenway Park.

BOSTON —The Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals tied for the best record in baseball in the regular season.

Each team led its league in runs, with solid starting pitching and a dominant closer emerging midway through the season.

But if you’re looking for a favorite in the World Series that begins at Fenway Park on Wednesday, it’s got to be the Red Sox — by a whisker.

Boston’s dugout is overflowing with facial hair these days, part of a bonding ritual that began when Jonny Gomes showed up scruffy at spring training.

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