News

Record-setter dives into 48-hour swim for charity

Record-setter dives into 48-hour swim for charity

RECORD SETTING SWIM: U.S. long-distance swimmer Diana Nyad takes a breath during her 48 hour continuous swim at Herald Square in New York Oct. 8, 2013. Photo: Reuters/REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

By Luke Swiderski

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A month after a record-setting swim from Cuba to Florida, Diana Nyad has moved on from the real sharks of the Florida Straits to the metaphorical ones of New York City.

Nyad, who last month covered the 110 miles of open ocean in 53 hours on Tuesday set off on a 48-hour swim to nowhere in a pool in New York’s Herald Square, in a charity event to raise money to help the 25,000 people who are still displaced from their homes a year after Superstorm Sandy hammered the New York and New Jersey coastlines.

The challenges are different in the 120-foot-long (37-meter) two-lane pool set up by sponsor Procter & Gamble for her attempt near a busy Manhattan intersection.

“In Cuba there was this huge emotional pressure,” Nyad told Reuters. “That was about setting a record. That was about ego. This is about other people.”

Nyad’s swim will attempt to raise money for disaster-relief organization AmeriCares by encouraging people to make online donations.

On Tuesday, members of the U.S. Coast Guard, and New York’s fire and police departments took turns swimming along with Nyad, as her pink cap glided up and down the pool.

“It was unbelievable!” said firefighter Tom Dolan, 45, after emerging from his spell swimming with Nyad. Dolan, who hails from the Breezy Point, New York, one of the shore towns hit hardest by the storm, said he is doubly appreciative of her effort “to help us keep our energy and focus and realize we are not done yet.”

A roster of celebrities, including Olympic Gold medalist Ryan Lochte, was scheduled to join Nyad in the pool, while others looked on. Joe Manganiello, of the HBO show “True Blood” said he came to celebrate Nyad’s achievement in the Florida Straits.

“What’s unbelievable is that her first attempt was in her 20s,” Manganiello said, referring to Nyad’s four failed attempts to conquer the distance before finally succeeding at age 64. “What she shows is that if you don’t fail, you don’t come back harder.”

Recent Headlines

17 hours ago in Local

Members of State’s Congressional delegation asks Boeing to reconsider servicing Iran

A Boeing 737 painted with the new logo and livery of Alaska Airlines is shown, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, before its unveiling at an employee event in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Three members of our State's Congressional delegation...Dave Reichert, Cathy McMorris-Rogers and Dan Newhouse have contacted the presidents of Boeing and Airbus asking them to halt or reconsider potential sales of airplane parts and other aircraft-related services to Iran.

18 hours ago in Local

School kids across the state are “feeling the Bern,” voting for Sanders in mock primary

bernie-sanders-portrait-03

The State's MOCK Presidential Primary... where K-12 students across the state cast their ballots... showed Bernie Sanders with a commanding lead.

18 hours ago in Local

Washington’s wildfire season off to an abrupt and early start

A line of fire snakes along a hillside at dusk Friday, July 18, 2014, in Winthrop, Wash. A fire racing through rural north-central Washington destroyed about 100 homes, leaving behind smoldering rubble, solitary brick chimneys and burned-out automobiles as it blackened hundreds of square miles. Friday's dawn revealed dramatic devastation, with the Okanagan County town of Pateros, home to 650 people, hit especially hard.

Fire officials say they were surprised to see wildfires burning this early west of the Cascades, particularly one that burned nearly 300 acres. The blazes fueled worries about what lies ahead.

18 hours ago in Local

6 year old girl rushed to hospital after falling from moving car in Lynnwood

hospital

The girl apparently fell out of the car as it was making a turn from a parking lot.

18 hours ago in Local

Two pregnant women in state test positive for Zika

Photo by Center for Disease Control and Prevention

The mosquito-bourne virus is especially dangerous for expectant mothers because it's been linked to birth defects.