Thom Yorke’s band pulls music from Spotify

Thom Yorke’s band pulls music from Spotify

Thom Yorke's group Atoms For Peace has pulled its tracks from Spotify. Photo: WENN

Thom Yorke’s group Atoms For Peace has pulled its tracks from Spotify over fears the popular streaming service is “bad for new music.”

Bandmember Nigel Godrich announced the decision to fans on Sunday, insisting the musicians want to take a stand for up-and-coming artists.

In a series of posts on his Twitter page, he writes, “We’re off of Spotify… Can’t do that no (sic) more man… Small meaningless rebellion. Someone gotta (sic) say something. It’s bad for new music…”

“People are scared to speak up or not take part as they are told they will lose invaluable exposure if they don’t play ball. Meanwhile millions of streams gets them a few thousand dollars… Not like radio at all.”

“Streaming suits (back) catalog (material)… But cannot work as a way of supporting new artists’ work… Spotify and the like either have to address that fact and change the model for new releases or else all new music producers should be bold and vote with their feet. They have no power without new music.”

Radiohead frontman Yorke, who formed the side project in 2009, adds, “Make no mistake, new artists you discover on Spotify will no (sic) get paid. Meanwhile shareholders will shortly being rolling in it. Simples (sic). We’re standing up for our fellow musicians.”

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